Impressionism Opinion Blog

After looking at several examples of impressionistic art pieces I decided that I like Impressionistic art for the most part. I really enjoy the impressionist pieces that are of nature.  Three works especially appealed to me.

One of these works is Mont Sainte-Victoire, created by Paul Cézanne in his studio in France in 1902-1904. I enjoyed this piece because every time I looked at it I noticed something new about the painting. Though this type of style seems to be scattered, blocky and blurry there are a great amount of details to it. It allows the viewer to make their own interpretation.

e1936-1-1-pma

http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/102997.html

The other impressionistic piece that I was drawn to is Impression, sunrise, created by Claude Monet in 1873 at La Havre. This piece is not only a big deal because it was a shock to the art world of a new style but I also really liked how peaceful it is. It really emphasizes nature’s beauty with as little detail as possible.

impression-sunrise

http://www.claude-monet.com/impression-sunrise.jsp

I decided to compare impressionistic art with realism art. More specifically Mont Sainte-Victoire with Gustave Courbet realistic painting, The Meeting or, Bonjour Monsieur Courbet, created in 1854 in Montpellier, France and finished in Ornanas, France.

the-meeting

http://www.gustave-courbet.com/the-meeting.jsp

The first difference that I noted between these two paintings is that Paul Cézanne’s work Mont Sainte-Victoire is focused on nature whereas Gustave Courbet’s painting is focused on human interaction. I also noticed how detail varies amongst these two works. Mont Sainte-Victorie has minimal detail where The Meeting has a great amount of detail but it is important to note that the detail in this work is focused on the people interacting with one another. Realism focuses on everyday things occurring in society whereas impressionism focuses on modernity from the creator’s view.

Works Cited:

“Exhibitions – Cézanne and Beyond.” Philadelphia Museum of Art, www.philamuseum.org/exhibitions/312.html?page=3. Accessed 16 Oct. 2016.

Gersh-Nesic, Bath. “Impressionism: A Basic Overview.” About.com Education, 19 Sept. 2016, arthistory.about.com/od/impressionism/a/impressionism_10one.htm. Accessed 17 Oct. 2016.

“Impression Sunrise by Claude Monet.” Claude Monet – Paintings, Biography, Quotes of Claude Monet, www.claude-monet.com/impression-sunrise.jsp. Accessed 17 Oct. 2016.

“The Meeting, 1853.” Gustave Courbet – Paintings, Biography of Gustave Courbet, www.gustave-courbet.com/the-meeting.jsp. Accessed 18 Oct. 2016.

“Realism Movement, Artists and Major Works.” The Art Story, www.theartstory.org/movement-realism.htm. Accessed 17 Oct. 2016.

Rteacha’s channel. “Impressionism Crash Course.” YouTube, 27 Nov. 2007, www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQLwVtb8kDo. Accessed 16 Oct. 2016.

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2 thoughts on “Impressionism Opinion Blog

  1. Impressionistic art is an amazing type of art. The way they create these is simply breath taking. Some are very hard to see whats going on or very difficult to analyze, but these are pretty clear for the most part. I really enjoyed looking at the two you chose. I noticed that you said you liked Impressionistic art, but didn’t say if you liked realism art. If you like realism art, which one do you like more? And if you don’t like realism art, why or why not?

    Like

  2. I like how you found two pieces with a very different style to show the diversity of Impressionism. I agree that a lot of Impressionist paintings have little details or a certain ambiguity that makes them a lot more compelling than more Classical pieces.

    Like

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